Field Marshal Montgomery and Lt. General Omar Bradley in Normandy, France

GENERAL OMAR BRADLEY’S JUNE 6, 1944 D-DAY MAPS

The most historic maps of the 20th Century

On April 8, 2017, we authenticated, certified and registered Omar Bradley’s (1893 – 1981) D-Day maps to be one of only four sets in existence.  These maps were so rare that most experts did not know they existed outside of the Library of Congress.  Two years later, we believe we have located all four copies (Fourth copy was just confirmed as part of General Bradley’s archives at Carlisle, PA).

The four copies are located at: COPY 1 (Archive copy) Library of Congress – Washington D.C., COPY 2. private collection,  COPY 3. U.S. Army Heritage Center – Carlisle, PA (Also holds Omar Bradley’s entire estate), and COPY 4. U.S. Army Archives – Leavenworth, KS.  NOTE: Although the Army Heritage Center acknowledges they have Omar Bradley maps including D-Day maps, because of a sequestered inventory, we have not gained access to the maps at this time.  Once available, we will travel to the center for final confirmation.

These maps are from Operation Neptune and Operation Overlord under the Battle of Normandy.   They represent the greatest battle of the 20th Century.  The U.S. Army’s leading expert wrote “These maps are the Holy Grail of WWII artifacts… In terms of historical significance and rarity, these maps are a perfect 10.”  His confirmation as to the authenticity and rarity of these maps capped off hundreds of hours of research making the effort a complete success.

Curator Luther Hanson U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum

We would like to thank many U.S. government museums, archives and libraries that assisted us in authenticating these rare maps.  In the second photograph you can see U.S. Army Museum curator Luther Hanson inspecting Omar Bradley’s June 8, 1944 D-Day +2 map at the Quartermaster Museum at Fort Lee, Virginia.   We made multiple trips to his museum for guidance.  Mr. Hanson was the first to recognize the rarity and historical significance of these maps.  It was through his expertise and knowledge that we found the other copies.

 

 

 

 

 

Omar Bradley on his command ship the USS Augusta – the June 6, 1944 map was printed on this ship while off the coast of Normandy.

THE MOST HISTORIC MAPS OF THE 20TH CENTURY – OMAR BRADLEY’S HQ MAPS

JUNE 6, 1944 D-DAY      After two years of analysis of rare map sales worldwide, we have concluded that the General Omar Bradley June 6, 1944 D-Day map is not only the rarest and most desirable map of the Second World War, it is also the most rare and valuable map of the 20th century.  There is no map that better represents the 20th century and since this is the only map in private hands, it is also the rarest map of the 20th century.

Notice how the map is labeled as the FUSAG (FIRST U.S. ARMY GROUP) which represents the fictitious Army Group the Axis expected to land at Calais, France 235 miles from Omaha Beach.  If you are wondering about the famous artificial piers, parts of the artificial pier at Omaha Beach (Called the Omaha Mulberry) arrived on June 6th but were not operational for over a week away.

JUNE 7, 1944 D-DAY +1   The second rarest and most desirable map of the Second World War is the June 7, 1944 General Omar Bradley Headquarters map.  The amazing transition from the June 6th map shows the full allied effort secure the beachhead and connect with British, French and Canadian troops on Utah, Gold, Juno and Sword beachheads.

Since HQ Daily Situation Maps show the active battle lines and engaged enemy, you can see the enemy was not prepared for the wave of troops and equipment landing on shore.  And yet, the enemy forces and preparation would hold for many weeks.

JUNE 8, 1944 D-DAY +2   The third rarest and most desirable map of the Second World War is the June 8, 1944 General Omar Bradley Headquarters map.  Despite the artificial piers still being assembled, Allies managed to bring thousands of troops and tons of equipment and supplies on to the beachhead.   You can see by the map it was a Herculean effort… and an accomplishment the enemy never anticipated.

June 7, 1944 Omar Bradley Map Certification document by Historical Registry